Differences between よう、みたい、らしい、とみえる、そう


#21

@seanblue
@Anthropos888
In new N3 sentences that were added recently, we often tried to add context in a form of short dialogue as a less direct hint.
I think that going this way might be the best form of testing knowledge.
Ohh, and many alternative answers are added already :grin:


#22

I just came around this little problem here:

The grammar point clearly claims “to try to, to make sure that” = ようにする, yet the answer is just “ように”, which I find highly confusing since the grammar structure also claims “Verb + よう・に・する” and “Verb[ない] + よう・に・する”.

Not once does it mention that the する part can/has to be omitted in certain situations. I also didn’t find anything about that in the reading resources that are linked on BunPro, though I might have simply missed that.


#23

It’s not omitted. It’s right there in yellow as して.


#24

Hey :bowing_man:

The three examples in this lesson were using a bit different grammar point (including the sentence you are asking about). And we are really sorry about that. I have changed them to the ones that fit grammar point more. That yellow して was not a part of the expression.

Aように + B. Which means to do B so that A. It is phrase very similar to ために、のに etc, but the verb is generally something that is beyond speaker’s/writer’s/subject of B control/will. A is non-past verb.
It doesn’t have its own grammar point on Bunpro (yet). A is generally verb in potential form or negative form.

I will write some example sentences later, since it is sleeping time for me haha :zzz:

@seanblue


#25

The そう and にみえる grammar still have sentences where both answers are correct but bunpro marks the answer as wrong. Since the orange hints are almost identical you need to show a message when the user types in one or the other instead of marking the answer wrong.


#26

Hey!
I will be checking every sentence in those gramamar points today or tomorrow :sunglasses:


#27

Can anyone clarify why the sentence " Similar to sandals, they are easy to put on." is mitai ni instead of you ni?

Both explain themselves as “[Used to express similarity of someone/something to someone/something else. In terms of appearance or manner of doing something.]” - so I am pretty unclear as to when to use one vice the other.

Any assistance would be appreciated. Thank you.


#28

みたいに is more casual expression.
But other than that they are the same, when it comes to expressing similarity.v:+1:


#29

Thank you.

But for the sake of the exercise, is there a reason why you ni gives an incorrect answer when I put it in? Is there a way to know that this is a more casual sentence?


#30

It is working perfectly in this case, but since sandals are a noun, you have to add の before ように (it is not the case for みたい, which can simply follow noun). You have probably not used のように. :+1:


#31

Can BunPro reflect this for future acceptable entries (sorry, I know this isn’t a feature request page). Usually, BP is pretty good about alternative endings (or at least gives a “not looking for…” message but みたい and よう are fairly interchangeable and are presented as such in several grammar books.


#32

It is working perfectly in this case, but since sandals are a noun, you have to add の before ように (it is not the case for みたい, which can simply follow noun). You have probably not used のように. :+1:

@dlbmbis

Sorry, I forgot to mention you in the answer :bowing_man: