How often to click "study"…?

#1

This web site doesn’t seem to do as much hand-holding as Wanikani. I guess I can click “Study” as much as I want? But if I did that too much it would overwhelm my review queue…? How am I supposed to do this?

Sorry for asking such a noob question but I looked all over the forum and still don’t get it

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#2

I’m not sure there’s a “right way” really, but I’ll tell you what I did.

In the beginning I had already studied some grammar on Lingodeer, so I went through everything I already knew at about 15-25 new points per day. Then once I got new things, I worked my way down to what I felt I could handle in terms of new content per day. Figured out about how long it would take me to reach a goal, say new N4 materials, at said pace. After that it’s just a matter of doing so many reviews per day/week.

I will say that as I got to higher levels, I definitely slowed the pace down. I’m currently studying for N2 in July and I do 2 sets of 3 points per week, with the occasional week of 9 new points. This keeps me from overloading myself and allows me to do a lot of cramming in between to make sure I’ve really cemented the points, and even go back and re-read some of the curated readings/videos.

TL;DR- Just find a pace that works for you where you’re making progress you’re satisfied with, but not to the point that you don’t really remember how the grammar works after your review session is over.

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#3

I pretty much agree with Houndstooth. What workload you can handle really depends on your circumstances.
If you’re only on Bunpro once a day, I don’t think I’d enjoy doing 100 reviews in one go.
If you’re here 5 times, doing 10-25 reviews each isnt that bad.

For me, the most important guideline is moving along with other material.
It’s rather pointless to know lots of grammar but no kanji/vocab and the other way around.
Obviously a bit of a disbalance is fine, I’d even say it’s good to be ‘ahead’ with your Kanji studies, but I’m sure you get what I’m trying to say.

Find something you’re working towards (Finishing Genki, Reading a book with FolFlo, …) and move everything along at an somewhat even pace.

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#4

If it’s grammar you’ve studied previously and are comfortable with, you can be pretty aggressive with adding new lessons to your reviews— maybe 1-2 dozen per day. Just be aware that anytime you add a bunch of lessons at once (or knock out a bunch of reviews at once), they’ll all resurface again in similarly large batches.

When I’m going through completely new grammar, I usually go for 1-3 lessons per day unless they feel particularly easy, then maybe I’ll add more. I always add whatever looks easiest, which makes every single step forward feel non-intimidating.

The review system works best IMO if you can visit for small review sessions multiple times per day; check in frequently, but don’t spend very much time on each visit.

 

(Also, when lessons have similar English translations, or use the same Japanese vocabulary word, avoid adding those lessons to your reviews simultaneously. Otherwise, you might find yourself constantly confusing the similar grammar points for much longer than should be necessary.)

(Also also, I don’t know what the default setting is, but I’d recommend setting Ghost Reviews to “Minimal” to start with.)

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#5

And/or self-study sentences. :frowning:

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#6

I’ll echo “whatever works for you”. When I first picked up Bunpro I had already worked through a somewhat decent textbook, so I dumped all of the N5 lessons into my queue at once. I was in review hell for a while but it stabilized eventually.

After that I did 10 lessons per day until I finished N3, at which point I stopped doing new lessons completely for a while. I’ve recently started going through N2 at 3 lessons per day and it feels like a nice sustainable pace – right now I’m on track to finish in 19 days.

Something really nice about Bunpro is that you can reduce your workload in two ways; either by manually “burning” items that you know really well, or just removing them from your reviews so you can come back to them later. At this point I don’t even hesitate when I see something like だ or から, so there’s no reason to waste time reviewing them – that’s what the “I know this!” button is for. On the other hand, I don’t have any need to memorize keigo exceptions right now, so there are some N4 grammar points that I totally ignored. Bunpro gives you a lot of power with regard to how you tailor your studies, so “find what works for you” is really the best advice anyone can give you.

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